COVID-19 Message from Medical Directors

Person washing their hands with soap.

We write to thank you and with a reminder

We wanted to update and remind all of you about what to do should you or someone you know show symptoms of the COVID-19 illness. Fortunately, our community is doing very well, adhering to the Stay at Home Order from Yolo County Public Health and practicing social distancing. We will however need to remain vigilant regarding mitigation and response.

As COVID-19 becomes more widespread in the U.S., the university is preparing for the possibility that students, employees and instructors will come into direct or indirect contact with someone infected. In most of these circumstances with asymptomatic individuals, the risk to campus is very low. Most times, no further action is necessary aside from providing the guidance on monitoring  for new symptoms.

Please keep the following in mind.

  • Use the campus reporting protocol if you or an immediate family member have tested positive for COVID-19, or you have personal knowledge of a colleague who has tested positive for COVID-19.
  • Custodial services will thoroughly clean areas of possible or suspected COVID-19 contamination. If a confirmed case of COVID-19 is identified, an outside vendor will be contracted to clean that space, when indicated.
  • Follow medical advice, including public health guidance. The decision to stop home isolation should be made in consultation with your healthcare provider and state and local health departments. Most individuals with COVID-19 symptoms do not need testing, but your medical provider can help guide you as to whether testing is right for you.

People With COVID-19 Have a Wide Range of Symptoms
Those with COVID-19 could have symptoms ranging from mild to severe illness. These symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

The majority of individuals with COVID-19 have mild to moderate symptoms, and can care for themselves at home. The bottom line is, if you are concerned, please reach out to your medical provider.  We want to make sure you have all of the right information to help protect and care for yourself and to help protect your loved ones.

Sincerely,

Karega Paisley, MD, MPH
Director, Occupational Health Services

Cindy Schorzman, MD
Medical Director, Student Health and Wellness Center


More information and FAQs
 

  • Someone in My Building (office, apartment) Is Sick, What Should I Do?
  • If you are concerned that someone you know has COVID-19 or has been exposed to it, please use the COVID-19 Reporting Process so we can take appropriate action.

    If you have had indirect or tertiary contact (i.e., contact with someone who came into contact with an infected person), we are following CDC guidelines which consider this a low-risk scenario, not requiring any restrictions or self-isolation. We understand this can feel very scary and encourage managers and supervisors to help employees become informed and take precautions. 
  • What Should I Do if I (or one of my colleagues) Feels Sick?
  • Employees who are sick should follow CDC guidance and stay home and not go into crowded public places or visit people in hospitals. All employees should stay home if they are sick until at least 24 hours after their fever (temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit or 37.8 degrees Celsius or higher) and symptoms have resolved without the aid of cough suppressant, fever reducers, or other symptom-reducing medications.

    In cases where there is uncertainty, the campus occupational health clinic may be able to provide a fitness-for-duty evaluation in cases.  Or, if the employee is a student, the student health clinic will assist. Please contact the clinic before sending an employee:

    Davis Campus – Occupational Health Medical Clinic
    UC Davis Health – Employee Health Services
    Student Employees – Student Health and Wellness Center

    If occupational health is not available, managers can encourage employees to see their personal doctor for evaluation.

     
  • I need a space disinfected or cleaned?
  • During suspended operations custodial services continues to clean restrooms daily, empty trash according to your normal schedule, as well as complete spill clean ups as needed. Custodial staff are also disinfecting high touch areas, such as door knobs, light switches, hand rails, reception desks, elevator buttons, and toiletry dispensers, using EPA approved disinfectants, on a daily basis. Finis Jones, Director of Custodial Services, shared that instances of possible or suspected COVID-19 cases on campus should be communicated to custodial services as early as possible so that those spaces can be thoroughly cleaned. Additionally, if a confirmed case of COVID-19 is identified, an outside vendor will be contracted to clean that space. As with previous years, custodial services will complete project work during the summer break: if you have a request for a project please submit it to custodial@ucdavis.edu.

  • Please Explain the COVID-19 Reporting Process
  • You may use the COVID-19 Reporting Process, which does the following:

    >  Engages the UC Davis Student Health Clinic, Occupational Health Services and the Privacy Officer to review the medical circumstances surrounding potential issues.
    > Coordinates with medical and administrative staff to provide medical guidance to the affected individual, ascertain risk to the campus, while continuing to balance the need for privacy. The primary concern is the overall safety of the campus.


    Our review also evaluates proximity issues for individuals having close or even tertiary contact with known positive cases. In most of these circumstances with asymptomatic individuals, the risk to campus is very low. Most times, no further action is necessary aside from providing the guidance on monitoring  for new symptoms.

    In any case, we welcome you to use the reporting process described above in an effort to engage the review team and provide support for all affected parties.

  • When Can a Sick Person End Self-Isolation and Return to Work?
  • If you will not have a test to determine if you are still contagious
    You can leave home after all these three things have happened:


    You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
    AND

    other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
    AND

    at least 10 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared

    If you will be tested to determine if you are still contagious
    You can leave home after all these three things have happened:
    You no longer have a fever (without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
    AND
    other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
    AND
    you received two negative tests in a row, 24 hours apart. Your doctor will follow CDC and local public health guidelines.
  • How to Care For a Sick Person at Home
  • If you are sick and are caring for yourself at home, please take the following steps and Call 911 if you have a medical emergency.

    Stay home. Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. Do not leave your home, except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.

    Take care of yourself. Get rest and stay hydrated.

    Monitor your symptoms.  Trouble breathing is a more serious symptom that means you should get medical attention. If you have any of the emergency warning signs for COVID-19 listed above, get medical attention immediately.

    Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you have trouble breathing, or have any other emergency warning signs, or if you think it is an emergency.  If you have a medical appointment that cannot be postponed, call your doctors office, and tell them you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the office protect themselves and other patients.

    Avoid public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

    As much as possible, stay in a specific room and away from other people and pets in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available. If you need to be around other people or animals in or outside of the home, wear a cloth face covering.

    Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.

    Throw away used tissues in a lined trash can.

    Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

    Do not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people in your home.

    Wash these items thoroughly after using them with soap and water or put in the dishwasher.

    Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in your sick room” and bathroom. Let someone else clean and disinfect surfaces in common areas, but not your bedroom and bathroom. High-touch surfaces include phones, remote controls, counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables

    If a caregiver or other person needs to clean and disinfect a sick persons bedroom or bathroom, they should do so on an as-needed basis. The caregiver/other person should wear a mask and wait as long as possible after the sick person has used the bathroom

    Use household cleaners and disinfectants. Clean the area or item with soap and water or another detergent if it is dirty. Then, use a household disinfectant.  Be sure to follow the instructions on the label to ensure safe and effective use of the product. Many products recommend keeping the surface wet for several minutes to ensure germs are killed. Many also recommend precautions such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.  Complete disinfection guidance for households can be found here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cleaning-disinfection.html

    Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.